Features

Joette Reger of Garden Gate

Aren’t we the lucky ones! We get a chance to plant a home garden again in the fall. Yes, we get to garden again. Just when those Yankees are oiling and putting away all of their garden tools for next spring, we can prepare for a whole new crop. Fall gardens are much like spring gardens except that the fall vegetables and herbs are not so hot and thirsty all of the time.

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Selectively applied Ferric Gray metallic accents sets BMW X4 M40i apart

The sculpted lines of the BMW X4 M40i give this Sports Activity Coupe a sleek, attractive appearance.

With a starting MSRP of $59,250 (for the 2018 model year), the exterior of the BMW X4 M40i is differentiated from other BMW X4 models, making it stand out as a clear member of the BMW M Performance family. Exclusive Ferric Gray metallic accents, such as in the accents on the front of the vehicle, as well as the optional 20-inch M double-spoke wheels and black chrome tailpipes on both sides, emphasize the unique character of the X4 M40i.

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Dora Nisby, Linda Esch, Tara Jones and Michael Mahood

When a community suffers a natural disaster, sometimes it’s the little things that help residents return to normal, like being able to check out books at the library.

After Hurricane Harvey, officials found mold growing inside Central High School buildings, as previously reported by The Examiner.

Freshman still meet on the campus in buildings that weren’t affected. Tenth through 12th-grade students are meeting at the building that used to be Stephen F. Austin Middle School, according to BISD spokesperson Nakisha Burns.

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Carl Parker

History is filled with the accounts of attempts to meld religion and government, and the subsequent wars. Lessons are to be learned from the crusades and the Spanish Inquisition. We should remember why the pilgrims left England and came to America. Kings tried to mandate the choice of religions for hundreds of years. And there are those today who would have the U.S. government do the same thing.

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Robert Sloan

Last Sunday morning, the perfect storm blew through Southeast Texas, one that could easily sink boats.

“I got up at 7 a.m., went outside and the wind was dead calm,” says Sabine Lake guide Jerry Norris. “The forecast was showing that the front would be moving through around noon, or maybe a little earlier. We had been catching a lot of trout on the north end of the lake, and it was tempting to load the boat and head out. But having been caught on the water with a cold front moving through, we decided to cancel the trip and set up for another day.”

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