Joette Reger's archive

Ok, I’ll admit, it has been just nasty outside lately. But as we optimists know, this just gives us a little time to plan for our springtime yards in the better weather to come. Let’s think about using this time to decide what we could do better this year. Or maybe we can use this time to dream about new areas of our yard that we could develop. Maybe we could get rid of a little bit of lawn and replace it with something much more earth-friendly.

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If you have ever thought about growing fruit trees in your yard, you will be excited to learn of an upcoming workshop sponsored by Texas A&M Agri-Life Extension Office of Jefferson County. The Urban Fruit Tree Workshop: Growing Fruit on The Gulf Coast will be held Jan. 24. And we are in for a treat. Keynote speaker Tom Leroy comes to us very well suited to lead the program, along with our Local Citrus Expert Panel.

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Say “decorate for Christmas” and many of us immediately think of the plants that say Christmas. Your decorating list could include poinsettias, paperwhites, rosemary, amaryllis, holly, Christmas cactus, Christmas rose, mistletoe and your own Christmas tree. 

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Plumbago, for one, needs some freeze cover.

Some years, we get to slide by with few days below freezing, but just one night left out in the cold and unprotected like the Snow Queen can prove fatal to some of your most beautiful plants. There are some tips and tricks to protecting your beauties from the harshest of days.

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Lots of local gardeners have great luck with growing grapes, and I wondered why. According to the Texas Wine and Grape Growers Association (TWGGA), Texas is the site of the first vineyard established in North America. It was established by Franciscan priests close to 1659. As European settlers followed the development of mission outposts, they brought more grapevine cuttings. The grape growing industry in Texas developed through the 1800s.

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