Robert Sloan's archive

This 3-pound bass ate a 12-inch worm fished at the base of the tree in the backg

With surface water temperatures on East Texas lakes holding steady in the mid to upper 80s, one thing is certain – bass are going to be feeding deep. Three of the best lures to catch deep bass are crankbaits, worms and jigs.

A few days ago I was fishing with Dennis Lala, who has been catching bass on Texas lakes for over 60 years.

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Fishing along the coast kicked into high gear this past weekend, with good numbers of trout, flounder and even king mackerel being caught.

One of the best fishing reports I’ve got is from Sabine Lake guide Jerry Norris. His top catches of trout, along with a few reds, have been around the rigs east of the jetties in 20 to 25 feet of water.

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Expect the unexpected when fishing around big offshore shrimpers. Live, dead and

The Gulf of Mexico shrimping season opened July 15 in both state and federal waters. That is nothing but good news for a whole lot of anglers looking to tangle with a variety of fish.

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Toledo Bend

Believe it or not, Toledo Bend has repeated as the No. 1 spot in the nation for bass fishing. This is a first, rock solid proof that we have an incredible lake within quick-hit traveling distance from Southeast Texas. Toledo Bend keeps the crown and is the only lake to earn the title more than once since the creation of Bassmaster’s 100 Best Bass Lakes rankings.

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The Fourth of July holiday weekend always sets the stage for a mega surge in boating here in Southeast Texas and, of course, the lakes and rivers of the Pineywoods. In fact, what makes the right side of Texas such a big draw for so many boaters are the many options. Along the coast we’ve got Sabine Lake, the Sabine jetties, Keith Lake, the surf and East Galveston Bay. In Beaumont, we’ve got the Neches River; in Lumberton, there is Village Creek; on the Texas-Louisiana border, there is the Sabine River. Farther inland is big Sam Rayburn and Toledo Bend.

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