bleaching

A new NOAA outlook shows that many coral reefs across around the world will likely be exposed to higher-than-normal sea temperatures for an unprecedented third year in a row, leading to increased bleaching – and with no signs of stopping.

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Seascape of bleached plating Montipora corals on Jarvis' forereef.

A new NOAA outlook shows that many coral reefs across around the world will likely be exposed to higher-than-normal sea temperatures for an unprecedented third year in a row, leading to increased bleaching – and with no signs of stopping.

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A coral in August 2015 (top) at the start of the worst bleaching event.

Global warming and the current intense El Niño are prolonging the longest global coral die-off on record, according to NOAA scientists, who will will present the latest global bleaching update and outlook Friday, Feb. 26 at the 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting in New Orleans.

The researchers, who are monitoring and forecasting the loss of corals from disease and heat stress due to record ocean temperatures, report that the global coral bleaching event that started in 2014 could extend well into 2017.

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