coleus

Years ago I started buying plants for the yard, and if I saw it and it was pretty, I bought it. The result was areas full of bits and pieces and mostly flowering little plants that were pretty labor intensive. Then I went to a gardening lecture at our Beaumont Botanical Center where the speaker spoke about a plan for the yard. Crazy talk. He suggested a list of attributes that you would want in any plant in your yard. He also talked about the possibility of using no flowers at all in your landscape!

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Baby zinnia grown from seed

I just can’t think of any gardening that is more fun than growing from seed. That is, of course, when the outcome is what you expect. There are some simple ways to make seed growing a good experience. When you can master “the seed,” you can start your garden earlier in the season, have plants that are unique and make sure that everything is grown organically. 

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Talk about “Texas Tough,” the coleus is just that. As we know the weather around here can be hotter than Hades one week and dry as a bone, then comes five days of rain and little sunshine. When those folks up North brag that their plants can survive the heat of over 90 degrees we just kind of giggle. We have the plus and minus of long growing seasons, hot summers and mild, erratic winters. One plant option that can serve us well here is the coleus.

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