Houston Zoo

Orangutans not only share 98 percent of our DNA, but they are also treasured and beloved animals – and they need help in order to survive the decline.

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Photo by Stephanie Adams/Houston Zoo

UPDATE: (Aug. 11, 2016) – The Houston Zoo’s baby sea lion has a name! The six-week-old female California sea lion has been named TJ by two of the zoo’s donors. Joe and Cathy Cleary won the honor of naming the pup at the zoo’s annual fundraising gala in April--Zoo Ball.

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Stephanie Adams/Houston Zoo

This spring, three tiny green bush vipers were born on March 26. Like most pit vipers, the neonates were born live instead of hatched from eggs like many other types of snakes. Originally a part of a group of six, only three have survived and have doubled in weight since their birth. They are expected to grow to be between 18 and 24 inches long. Despite their name, green bush vipers vary in color, mostly shades of green, but can also be bright yellow or grey.

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Houston Zoo logo

The Houston Zoo and the Wildlife Conservation Network will partner to host a full-day Saving Wildlife Expo at the zoo April 23 inside the Brown Conservation Education Center.

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Since his arrival in 1992, Blanco, the Houston Zoo’s leucistic (white) alligator has been a favorite of both guests and staff, and has been the centerpiece attraction in the Reptile and Amphibian House. As a leucistic alligator, he is also very rare, and is one of only 13 still currently alive from an original number of 18 that hatched in 1987 in Louisiana. However, as time has passed, Blanco has outgrown his current space.

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Announced March 15 on NBC’s Today Show, a Houston Zoo’s Coquerel’s sifaka — a type of lemur — is one of 10 animals featured on National Geographic’s April covers. According the magazine, “In a publishing first for National Geographic magazine, the April 2016 issue has 10 different covers featuring the work of well-known National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore.”

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A guest interacts with Smaug at the Houston Zoo.

Smaug, the Houston Zoo’s 17-year-old Komodo dragon, was humanely euthanized on Nov. 17, 2015 after significant lumbar spinal cord compression was found. The zoo’s herpetology and veterinary team made the decision after an MRI and CT scan showed that his condition was severe and his quality of life was beginning to suffer as he was unable to walk.

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