Know your rights

Q. I’m a landlord and paranormal investigator. I have had a lot of people ask me this question: If someone is murdered or dies in a house or apartment, does the landlord have to tell potential tenants about paranormal activity? I know when something like this happens, the spirit can stay there and make noises, like doors shutting, footsteps and names being called. Does the landlord have to disclose this information? Also, if the landlord knows that one of the houses has paranormal activity going on, is it legal for him to charge more?

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Q. I owe a lot of money and can’t pay my bills. My largest debt is for a student loan. I have been told that even if I file bankruptcy, I will still owe my student loans. Is this true?

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Q. I am moving out of my apartment. I know a landlord cannot deduct from a security deposit for “normal wear and tear.” What is normal wear and tear? Does the statute have a definition?

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Q. Is it lawful for a landlord to request a walk through every four months as part of a lease for a rental property? I’ve leased several homes and I have never had a landlord even suggest something like this. I feel like my privacy would be violated if I agreed to this. Therefore, I’m contemplating not signing the lease.

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Q. I had a divorce in January 2012. In the decree, a 2012 Toyota Corolla was awarded to my ex-wife. When we bought the car, it was in her name as the buyer and mine as the co-buyer. My ex-wife had been doing very well, making all the payments on this car, until April of this year. I thought my attorney had sent Toyota finance the divorce decree to show she was liable for all future payments.

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Q. I recently had a small fire in my apartment. I think it was caused by the new clothes dryer I had installed. The landlord collected for the damage to his building from his insurance company. Now the insurance company is coming after me for $60,000 because of a clause in my lease. This fire was not my fault. How can I be sued?

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Q. My father recently passed. Question is, he had made a will with a lawyer but never had it registered. Is the will still valid? What happens if he did not have a will? Does all the property go to the state?

A. A will is valid and enforceable once it is properly prepared and signed. In most cases, a will also is notarized. This is not necessary, but it does make it easier and less expensive to probate the will. A will, however, does not have to be filed or registered to be valid. The attorney may now file the will for probate.

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cracked windshield

Q. I was driving down the road when the large truck in front of me kicked up a small stone from the road into my windshield. I filed a claim with the owner of the truck, and it refused to pay. Do I have a case for small claims court? My friend was with me and can testify that she saw the stone thrown from the truck into my windshield.

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Q. I let a friend borrow the extra key to my apartment and he lost it. Can I require my landlord to change my locks?

A. Under the law, a landlord has an obligation to change the locks at his expense when a new tenant moves in. After that time, the landlord must change the locks whenever the tenant requests, as often as the tenant wants. The tenant, however, must pay the costs of installing the new locks. In other words, you can require your landlord to change your locks; however, you must pay the costs.

 

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Q. My son was hired as a mechanic’s assistant at $14 an hour. He told the supervisor that he had some experience, but he was willing to learn as he went along with the job. The supervisor was fine with this, and my son was given other duties as well. My son was very happy, always on time to work, apparently no problems. Last week he was called to the office and told they had hired a previous ex-employee to come back as the assistant. My son was given the option to go work in another job, but his pay would be reduced to $10 an hour. Is this legal?

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