Outdoors

The season opener on teal and doves was pretty much  a wash out. But all that changed with a full moon and a north wind last weekend. Instead of getting hammered by rain, a whole lot of hunters on ponds and in the marsh dropped easy limits of teal.

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 With the dove hunting opener fast approaching it’s time to get geared up with everything from a new hunting license to shotgun shells.

The new 2018-19 hunting and fishing licenses went on sale last week. Now is a good time to go ahead and renew. If you wait until the day before dove season opens you could be stuck standing in line for a good while. The most popular license is the Super Combo that includes both hunting and fishing and stamps. That way you’ve got everything on one piece of paper.

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Joette Reger of Garden Gate

Oh so attractive are the blooming Lily of the Nile lining the front garden beds of many of the homes in the Golden Triangle. The name agapanthus is translated from Greek as the “flower of love,” and I can see why. The ball-shaped blooms of gorgeous blue or white attract hummingbirds and other pollinators from late June until August or September.

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Cold and wet weather put the skids to fishing on inland lakes and bays last weekend, but with a decent warming trend this week, things should pick up.

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Dill weed

Now don’t start asking, “Why are we reading about a weed?” This weed is invariably in the dishes of most Eastern European and Scandinavian dishes, and it is delicious and super easy to grow. Dill weed is that super fresh herb of winter.

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Joette Reger of Garden Gate

It is such a thrill each year to see the little buds come out on my Christmas cactus plants. Seems like they tease me for about three weeks before the buds turn into gorgeous blooms. What a seasonal decoration! Between blooming seasons, I keep them along with “expired” orchids on the tile floor under a piano. That way, it is hard to forget to give them watering every week or so until they surprise me with blooms again.

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Robert Sloan

The cold front that moved through Southeast Texas last weekend was a game changer that will set up some excellent deer hunting for the opener Nov. 4. Plus, it definitely moved a lot of ducks down the Central Flyway and into the coastal marshes and backwater lakes for the South Zone opener this weekend. And don’t forget about the fishing. The topwater bite on Sam Rayburn and Toledo Bend is going strong, and along the coast, black drum and bull reds are on a big run.

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The good news is that the teal season is open through Sept. 24, but the bad news is that most of the very popular public hunting areas in Southeast Texas are closed due to the wrath of Hurricane Harvey. But with a well-timed cool front last week and the full moon Sept. 6, we had a load of teal migrate down the Central Flyway and settle into flooded fields in this region of Texas.

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Being a Texas game warden is not all that easy and at times it can be downright grizzly with lives on the line. It involves extensive night work and dealing with scum of the earth that are most often carrying guns, liquored up and downright mean. I’ve rounded up some of the trials and tribulations that Texas wardens run into on a daily basis. Some are comical, while others are downright crazy.

Sam Rayburn Jet Ski without a driver

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This 3-pound bass ate a 12-inch worm fished at the base of the tree in the backg

With surface water temperatures on East Texas lakes holding steady in the mid to upper 80s, one thing is certain – bass are going to be feeding deep. Three of the best lures to catch deep bass are crankbaits, worms and jigs.

A few days ago I was fishing with Dennis Lala, who has been catching bass on Texas lakes for over 60 years.

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