Texas law

Q. I pay my bills by mail. My due date is the first of the month and I have a 10-day period before they charge a late fee. I always mail my check by the tenth day. The company has begun charging me interest and a late fee. How can I be charged a late fee if I can prove my payment was mailed before the due date?

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Q. I am 60 years old and my English is not very good. I usually get very nervous speaking to a group or to people I don’t know. I want to file a claim in justice court, but I am afraid I will not be able to communicate well with the judge. I know I can have a lawyer, but that will be expensive. I have a grown son who has said he will assist me, but I don’t know if that will be allowed. Can my son help me in court?

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Q. My friend was late on her rent at an apartment complex. One day she came home and found a lien notice where her TV used to be. They took both of her TVs in the apartment. Isn’t this stealing? Is this legal for them to do?

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Q. Is it true that medical bills or accounts are not allowed to remain on your credit report for more than four years in the state of Texas?

A. It is not true. Medical bills are basically the same as any other debt. They stay on your credit report for seven years. There is a four-year statute of limitations for filing a lawsuit for a debt; however, the fact that you cannot be sued does not mean you no longer owe the debt, and it will not become “obsolete” and removed from your credit report for seven years.

 

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Q. About two years ago, my wife and I ran into financial difficulty and made the choice to attempt to settle our credit card debt. Most creditors settled with us, but one credit card company wouldn’t settle, so we quit paying altogether. If we are sued and have a judgment against us for this debt, can our wages be garnished? I guess essentially we want to know what can happen for non-payment of credit card debt. Thank you.

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Q. At one time, Texas law allowed a person who had his identity stolen to have his credit reports locked. Is this still true?

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Q. I am moving out of my apartment. I know a landlord cannot deduct from a security deposit for “normal wear and tear.” What is normal wear and tear? Does the statute have a definition?

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