texas parks and wildlife department

photo by Robert Sloan

One thing is certain about boating – its unpredictable adventure on just about every trip out.

A Texas game warden got a call about a missing boat that was last seen on Lake Somerville. The boat’s occupants were already two hours late getting home. The wind was blowing over 30 miles an hour that day, and the waves were over 4 feet. The boaters got lucky. They were found. The high waves had caused the boat to take on water and sink, forcing the occupants to swim to shore. One of them was taken to the hospital for hypothermia, but they were otherwise OK.

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The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department is considering new regulations that will affect hunting and fishing here in East and Southeast Texas counties. One of those regs is aimed at creating additional deer hunting opportunities in East Texas.

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Robert Sloan photo

A boating accident on the Angelina River that took two lives over the Memorial Day weekend was one of many boating-related fatalities over a three-day span.

“Texas game wardens investigated seven drowning deaths and another four boating-related fatalities over what proved to be one of the state’s deadliest Memorial Day weekends,” says Mike Cox with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

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Memorial Day weekend is upon us, and this is typically a time when thousands of folks across Texas take to the lakes, rivers and bays in boats, jet skis, kayaks and canoes. It’s also a weekend when game wardens will be out in numbers checking to make sure that you’ve got enough life jackets on board and that the person running the boat is not drinking and driving.

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Castro

A Texas man has pleaded guilty to nine charges of possession of oversized reds, one charge of no saltwater fishing license, and one charge of exceeding the possession limit for red drum, according to Mike Cox with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

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Red snapper

The National Marine Fisheries Service is once again tampering with red snapper regulations for recreational anglers, and it’s not sitting very well with both fishermen and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. This month, the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, part of the NMFS, voted to recommend an emergency rule that could shorten the recreational red snapper fishing season in federal waters off the Texas coast to as little as 11 days from the planned 27 day season.

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